T'boli dress

By the Ming Dynasty, ruqun became the most common form of attire for women. The sleeves of the blouse are mostly curved with a narrow sleeve cuff (琵琶袖, pipa sleeve). There is often an optional detachable protective huling (護領, lit. "protect collar") sewn to the collar. The huling can be white or any other dark colours. The collar is of the same colour as the clothing. Towards the start of the Qing Dynasty , the skirt was mostly baizhequn (百摺裙, lit. "hundred pleats skirt") or mamianqun (馬面裙, lit. "horse face skirt"). [ 15 ]

The Lumad are people from various ethnic groups in Mindanao island. Residing in their ancestral lands, [24] they are often evicted and displaced due to the Moro people 's claim on the same territory. [25] The Lumad have lost parts of their ancestral land due to a failure to understand the modern land tenure system. [26] To counter this, the Lumad established schools in their communities, supplying essential knowledge for the tribe members that would protect their rights, property and culture. [27] However, the Lumad communities are located in mountains that are distant from urban areas. These areas are also the location sites of armed conflict between the New People's Army (NPA) and the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) . Caught in the conflict, the Lumad people's education, property, and security are endangered because of the increasing amount of military activity by the armed parties. [26] Increasing military activity have eventually led to the displacement of the communities to shelter sites. [28] Anxiety continues to grow among the Lumad with the escalation of armed conflict and detainment of community leaders (tribe leaders and teachers) labelled as rebels by the military. [29] Alternative schools within the communities (aided by NGOs and universities) face concerns of closing down or demolition of their property, with some buildings converted by the military for their use. [30] Lumad leaders and tribesmen, having experienced political detention due to false suspicions as well as the displacement of their tribes from their areas, have demanded respect for their human rights. [31]

When the sun was down, I went for a refreshing actual boat ride and fed fish in the lake pond. The boat was owned by my guide’s Uncle and he said not to mind the rent. I was touched with this warm hospitality as I thought I would not be able to experience the lake because the commercial rate PHP500 for motorboat rent is just too costly for me. I wanted to wait for sunset at the lake but Kuya guide suggested we join the 15 th T’boli Seslong Festival thirty minutes away. I thought it was too far and that it would be too late already but then out of curiosity I agreed. Kuya succeeded with his PR-pro that the fest is highly swarmed by prominent actors and tourists.

During my visit to the Tboli weaving centre Manlikika Bayan, it was evident that they were still mourning the loss of their leader, grandmother and National Living Treasure Awardee Mrs Lang Dulay, who’s memorial grave lays opposite the entrance. Lang Dulay was known nationwide as the originator and master weaver of Tnalak. Weaving since the age of 12, Lang Dulay translated over 100 designs from her dreams and made it her personal mission to instill her passion and vision for Tboli culture on her family, by taking her 18 grandchildren and great grandchildren out of school to train them in the making of Tnalak. Tourists from all over the Philippines would flock to see and buy Tnalak from the living legend and her aspiring proteges, but last year at the age of 91 she passed away from a stroke leaving behind a financially dependent family of weavers with little other employability skills. The family are now desperately trying to find the balance between economic stability and continuing their cultural heritage now that Lang Dulay the master dreamweaver has gone.

The Tboli people are one of the indigenous peoples of South Cotabato in Southern Mindanao . The body of ethnographic and linguistic literature on Mindanao, they are variously known as Tboli, T'boli, Tböli, Tiboli, Tibole, Tagabili, Tagabeli, and Tagabulu. They term themselves Tboli or T'boli. Their whereabouts and identity are somewhat imprecise in the literature; some publications present the Tboli and the Tagabili as distinct peoples; some locate the Tbolis to the vicinity of the Lake Buluan in the Cotabato Basin or in Agusan del Norte . The Tbolis, then, reside on the mountain slopes on either side of the upper Alah Valley and the coastal area of Maitum , Maasim and Kiamba . In former times, the Tbolis also inhabited the upper Alah Valley floor. After World War II , ., since the arrival of settlers originating from other parts of the Philippines, they have been gradually pushed onto the mountain slopes. As of now, they are almost expelled from the fertile valley floor.

T'boli dress

t'boli dress

During my visit to the Tboli weaving centre Manlikika Bayan, it was evident that they were still mourning the loss of their leader, grandmother and National Living Treasure Awardee Mrs Lang Dulay, who’s memorial grave lays opposite the entrance. Lang Dulay was known nationwide as the originator and master weaver of Tnalak. Weaving since the age of 12, Lang Dulay translated over 100 designs from her dreams and made it her personal mission to instill her passion and vision for Tboli culture on her family, by taking her 18 grandchildren and great grandchildren out of school to train them in the making of Tnalak. Tourists from all over the Philippines would flock to see and buy Tnalak from the living legend and her aspiring proteges, but last year at the age of 91 she passed away from a stroke leaving behind a financially dependent family of weavers with little other employability skills. The family are now desperately trying to find the balance between economic stability and continuing their cultural heritage now that Lang Dulay the master dreamweaver has gone.

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