Mastoid gland

Mr Banerjee is one of the UK’s most experienced and respected ENT Specialists, his private practice is based at the Nuffield Health Tees Hospital; a friendly, highly equipped hospital on the outskirts of Stockton-On-Tees.
Meet The Surgeon Mr Banerjee is the Director of the North East Implant Programme and co-lead for commercial research for NIHR (nationwide research organisation). He has been Honorary Secretary for ENT UK and a council member of the otology section of the Royal Society of Medicine. Having surgically trained in Cambridge, Mr Banerjee undertook his fellowship in Australia. He is very much involved with the development of bone conduction hearing devices and regularly invited as guest lecturer for many international meetings as far reaching as Canada and Thailand. Mr Banerjee is the Chairman of the Medical Advisory Committee of Nuffield Hospital Tees. He undertakes regular audits of surgical results comparable to international standards.

As aforementioned, there are a number of air-filled cavities called mastoid cells inside the bony protrusion that directly communicates with the middle ear. In case of an ear infection, the mastoid cells may become septic if the infectious matter drains in to the posterior portion of the ear. This condition is clinically termed as “mastoiditis”. A swollen mastoid process typically produces symptoms like excruciating pain, tenderness/soreness, headaches, redness and hearing loss. Treatment with antibiotics as well as use of ear irrigation can aid in the removal of the contagious material. Severe blow to the head can often hurt the skull and cause serious injury to the pyramidal process as well as to the temporal bone. Fractures or bruises to the mastoidal structure can be clearly determined by using imaging techniques, such as radiography/X-ray. Depending on the severity of the case, doctors may suggest several methods to repair or stabilize the fractured bone.

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There is a 25–50% risk of temporary facial weakness following parotidectomy, and a 1–2% risk of permanent weakness. Frey's syndrome may be experienced by up to 90% of patients to some extent and causes perspiration on that side of the face with eating. There is very little or no risk of mortality associated with the surgery. The survival rate of malignant parotid gland tumors depends on their size, location, extension, and if metastasis has occurred. The 10-year survival rate ranges from 32% to 83%.

Q. What tests can the doctors do to see if I have cancer cells still in me? Am using my friend user name. I had a mastectomy in October of the 3cms lump. They also removed lymph nodes from armpit. They found that 2 nodes were slightly infected and 2 blood vessels leading away were the same. My oncologist says I should start chemo for 5 months followed by 5 wks of radiotherapy. I am awaiting the results from bone, heart, lungs and blood tests. What tests can the doctors do to see if I have cancer cells still in me? A. You need to have your own self examination, which you can get guidance from doctor and all the tests which you already had and the tests which you are awaiting. Like you may have clinical examination, mammograms- which you already had, breast biopsy, ultrasonography, post biopsy pathology test, HER-2 gene test to find the speed of your tumor growth. Tests to check cancer spread – like lymph, bone, liver and lungs whose results you are waiting for.

Mastoid gland

mastoid gland

There is a 25–50% risk of temporary facial weakness following parotidectomy, and a 1–2% risk of permanent weakness. Frey's syndrome may be experienced by up to 90% of patients to some extent and causes perspiration on that side of the face with eating. There is very little or no risk of mortality associated with the surgery. The survival rate of malignant parotid gland tumors depends on their size, location, extension, and if metastasis has occurred. The 10-year survival rate ranges from 32% to 83%.

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